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Tag: SASP

Research mouse
April 14, 2021
A new study in Molecular Cell has shown that the benefits of hypoxia may be derived from a suppression of the inflammatory SASP. Why we Age: Cellular SenescenceAs your body ages, more of your cells become senescent. Senescent cells do not divide or support the tissues of which they are part; instead, they emit potentially...
the retina
February 08, 2021
A review published in the Journal of Neuroinflammation explores the potential application of senotherapies, particularly in the context of treating age-related macular degeneration [1]. Introducing cellular senescence One of the most advanced approaches to treating aging and age-related diseases is that of addressing the presence of harmful senescent cells, which begin to accumulate with advancing...
Dr. Judith Campisi
December 07, 2020
At Ending Age-Related Diseases 2020, Prof. Judith Campisi of the Buck Institute for Research on Aging discussed the effects and usage of senolytics, drugs that remove senescent cells from the body. She went into the details of the stress and damage signals that cause cells to become senescent and the markers of senescent cells, noting...
Electric brain
November 17, 2020
There has been a great deal of interest in the last few years in the potential regenerative properties of blood factors. This has led to two broad schools of thought: one in which there are regenerative factors in young blood that can be isolated, and another in which aged blood contains regenerative factors that cannot...
Using a meter
June 29, 2020
Researchers have published a new study suggesting that some of the inflammatory signals secreted by senescent cells could be used as a biomarker to measure aging and health. What are senescent cells? As you age, increasing numbers of your cells enter into a state known as senescence. Senescent cells do not divide or support the...
Alzheimer's disease
June 24, 2020
In a recent study, researchers from the Buck Institute have shown that cellular senescence, one of the hallmarks of aging, is partially responsible for Alzheimer's disease. Why we Age: Cellular SenescenceAs your body ages, more of your cells become senescent. Senescent cells do not divide or support the tissues of which they are part; instead,...