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Tag: SASP

Mouse test
Researchers publishing in Nature Communications have detailed how the removal of p16-producing senescent cells leads to improvements in the brains of female mice [1]. Disease-associated microglia and senescence This paper begins with a discussion of disease-associated microglia (DAM) and white matter-associated microglia (WAM). In the aging brain, these exhausted microglia have downregulated genes relating to...
Skin fibroblast
Researchers publishing in Aging have identified an individual protein, secreted frizzled-related protein 4 (SFRP4), that is produced by senescent cells and contributes to skin aging in mice. The spread of the SASP Why we Age: Cellular SenescenceAs your body ages, more of your cells become senescent. Senescent cells do not divide or support the tissues...
Scientists have improved the potential effectiveness of a stem cell therapy for osteoarthritis by targeting senescent cells [1]. Stem cell exhaustion and osteoarthritis Osteoarthritis is an age-related disease that affects joints by degrading cartilage. While not fatal in itself, osteoarthritis negatively affects mobility and quality of life, and it can decrease lifespan and healthspan. Several...
Two Directions Infinity
In a preprint published in bioRxiv, a team of Singaporean researchers, including Jan Gruber, has found that a combination of stem cell rejuvenation and senescent cell removal is synergistically more effective than either alone. Different but related aspects of aging Why we Age: Cellular SenescenceAs your body ages, more of your cells become senescent. Senescent...
Ginger root
A paper supported by the National Institute on Aging has shown that gingerenone A, a component of ginger extract, is a natural senolytic that is potentially more powerful and less toxic than the combination of dasatinib and quercetin [1]. Ginger and many other plants are widely known for their anti-inflammatory effects. Cellular senescence, in turn,...
Mice and food
New senolytics data was released from Dr. James L. Kirkland’s Mayo Clinic lab and published in The Lancet [1]. Prior studies have shown that α-Klotho protein decreases with age in mice and humans [2,3]. It has also been demonstrated that mice that lack α-Klotho have shorter lifespans, cognitive impairment, sarcopenia, vascular dysfunction, osteopenia, cardiac hypertrophy...

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