Help us: Donate
Follow us on:
×

Tag: Senolytics

handshake
A team of researchers have explained in Aging how multiple compounds that target the BCL-2 protein family are considerably more effective against senescent cells than each compound by itself [1]. The limitations of existing senolytics The researchers begin their paper with a familiar discussion of senescent cells and their dangers, citing a 2019 paper outlining...
Lit mouse on wheel
In their publication in eLife Sciences, researchers at Newcastle University in the UK have illustrated how radiation-induced damage can be somewhat ameliorated with senolytics. These researchers focused on navitoclax along with the well-known combination of dasatinib and quercetin. A focus on cancer survivors The researchers begin this paper with a discussion of cancer treatments. They...
Broken bone
A study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation has reported that senescent cells are largely responsible for slow bone healing in aged animals and that senolytics, which remove these harmful cells, can speed bone regeneration. A brief outline of bone healing BoneBone tissue serves as the primary structural component of our bodies. It protects...
Weightlifting Mouse
A paper published in GeroScience has reported that older mice taking the well-known senolytic combination of dasatinib and quercetin (D+Q) are able to build muscle more like young mice. Senescent cells harm muscle development Why we Age: Cellular SenescenceAs your body ages, more of your cells become senescent. Senescent cells do not divide or support...
Ginger root
A paper supported by the National Institute on Aging has shown that gingerenone A, a component of ginger extract, is a natural senolytic that is potentially more powerful and less toxic than the combination of dasatinib and quercetin [1]. Ginger and many other plants are widely known for their anti-inflammatory effects. Cellular senescence, in turn,...
Mice and food
New senolytics data was released from Dr. James L. Kirkland’s Mayo Clinic lab and published in The Lancet [1]. Prior studies have shown that α-Klotho protein decreases with age in mice and humans [2,3]. It has also been demonstrated that mice that lack α-Klotho have shorter lifespans, cognitive impairment, sarcopenia, vascular dysfunction, osteopenia, cardiac hypertrophy...

Want the latest longevity news? Subscribe to our Newsletter!