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Tag: mTOR

Easter Island
We take a look at rapamycin and why some researchers think it could be useful in combating aging. What is rapamycin? Rapamycin is a macrolide, a class of antibiotic that includes erythromycin, roxithromycin, azithromycin, and clarithromycin. Rapamycin exhibits potent antitumor and immunosuppressive activity. Where is rapamycin found? Rapamycin was first discovered in 1972 in the...
PEARL Rapamycin Campaign
Today is a doubly important day: it marks the final day of the PEARL campaign and it is a celebration of another victory for the life extension community. PEARL smashed its initial fundraising goal and sailed through its two stretch goals, raising just under $183k thanks to the generous support of the community. What is...
Chromatin and histones
Researchers have demonstrated that rapamycin, a drug that has long been believed to slow down aging, changes the way DNA is stored inside cells to support gut health and longevity [1]. This improvement to DNA storage has been observed in both fruit flies and mice in the lab, and the researchers believe that those benefits...
Respiratory tract infection
A new study published in The Lancet shows the results of Phase 2a and Phase 3 clinical trials for the effectiveness of mTOR inhibition on bolstering the aging immune system against respiratory illnesses. Immunosenescence increases disease risk As we grow older, our immune systems become increasingly dysfunctional and less able to defend us from the...
Elderly eyes
In a new paper published in Aging, researchers have determined that directly improving autophagy through flubendazole (FLBZ) is potentially useful in treating dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a disease that causes vision loss. An accumulation of lipids Dry AMD shares a surprising commonality with atherosclerosis. As our macrophages attack the fatty (lipid) deposits in our...
Research mouse
A new study in Molecular Cell has shown that the benefits of hypoxia may be derived from a suppression of the inflammatory SASP. Why we Age: Cellular SenescenceAs your body ages, more of your cells become senescent. Senescent cells do not divide or support the tissues of which they are part; instead, they emit potentially...