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Tag: Sarcopenia

Many lab mice
A new study published in Nature Communications has found that rapamycin, which is often considered to be a calorie restriction mimetic, has different and additive effects to caloric restriction in muscle tissue. The role of mTORC1 Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a well-known component of fundamental nutrient sensing pathways whose dysregulation is...
Skeletal Muscle
A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association has examined the dosage and safety of a urolithin A supplement [1]. This study also examined urolithin A's effect on muscle endurance and specific health biomarkers. A randomized, controlled clinical trial  This study is a follow-up to prior work done by the Amazentis company,...
Seniors walking
Researchers publishing in Aging Cell have shown a relationship between mitochondrial dysfunction and mobility decline in older adults. A changing longitudinal study Since 1958, a team of researchers from the National Institute on Aging Intramural Research program has been conducting the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA). The BLSA, which has been used for other...
Osteoarthritis
A new study shows that even low levels of physical activity are very good for your muscles, bones, and joints, but exercising too much can potentially harm you [1]. The unholy trinity Sarcopenia, osteoporosis, and osteoarthritis are the trio of age-related diseases that affect, respectively, muscles, bones, and joints. Sarcopenia is the progressive loss of...
Running mouse
A team of researchers publishing in Cell Death & Disease has found that the age-related decline of mitochondrial calcium uptake family member 3 (MICU3), a regulator of mitochondrial function, is associated with sarcopenia, the aging-associated loss of muscle. Why mitochondria control their calcium uptake The calcium ion, Ca2+, is vital in mitochondrial metabolism and interacts...
Elderly muscle
Muscular degradation with age isn’t the result of a decline in the intrinsic regenerative ability of muscles, according to new research [1].  Instead, sarcopenia is likely due to changes in the muscle microenvironment that reduce repair and regeneration. Declining muscles Age-related muscle loss can begin as early as a person’s fourth decade, and sarcopenia can...