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Tag: Judy Campisi

Research fundamentals
Two of the most prominent experts in the field have published a review of cellular senescence in the context of metabolism, and we bring you the highlights [1]. We rarely cover review papers, but when Cristopher D. Wiley and Judith Campisi, two of the most prominent experts on senescent cells, publish a review on senescence...
urine test
A lipid metabolite could serve as a novel biomarker to test the performance of senolytics, according to a new study [1]. Such a biomarker can be detected from blood or urine, allowing for non-invasive testing, and experiments have shown that it plays a functional role in cellular senescence. Slowing down to stay safe Cellular senescence...
Dr. Judith Campisi
At Ending Age-Related Diseases 2020, Prof. Judith Campisi of the Buck Institute for Research on Aging discussed the effects and usage of senolytics, drugs that remove senescent cells from the body. She went into the details of the stress and damage signals that cause cells to become senescent and the markers of senescent cells, noting...
Early Bird EARD2020
There has been a lot happening with the Ending Age-Related Diseases 2020 conference, so today is ideal for sharing some of the exciting things that we have planned. Catch the early bird! First things first: Time is running out to get an Early Bird discount for what will be the biggest online aging research conference...
swirl
Cellular senescence, discovered in 1961 by Leonard Hayflick and Paul Moorhead, is a state in which cells no longer perform their functions, instead emitting harmful chemicals that turn other cells senescent. Senescence is primarily caused by telomere shortening and DNA damage, and senescent cells are known to contribute to multiple diseases, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's,...
Today, we want to spotlight a new publication that charts the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), which consists of the various secreted signals given out by senescent cells during aging. Senescent cells and the SASP As we get older, an increasing number of our cells enter into a state known as senescence. They cease dividing and...