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Tag: DNA

Rendering of chromosomes
In a preprint paper, scientists have announced the completion of the first full, telomere-to-telomere, sequencing of the human genome, more than two decades after the first draft of its sequencing. This was made possible by new sequencing technologies [1]. Mind the gaps The human genome was first reported as being sequenced two decades ago by...
Magnifying glass on DNA
Senescent cells are surprisingly hard to identify, but a recent publication in Tissue and Cell makes the case for using cytoplasmic DNA as a marker of senescence. Why we Age: Cellular SenescenceAs your body ages, more of your cells become senescent. Senescent cells do not divide or support the tissues of which they are part;...
Centenarian
A new study has shown that people who live for over 105 years typically have a genetic makeup that allows better repair of DNA damage [1]. Looking at the genomes of people who enjoy extreme longevity There has always been lots of interest in what allows some people to live considerably longer than their peers,...
double strand break
Research further illuminating the mechanisms of impaired DNA damage repair associated with aging has recently been published in the journal Aging. Why we age: Genomic InstabilityGenomic instability is the result of gradual damage to DNA in ways that are not naturally repaired. This is a root cause of aging, and it leads to genetic mutations...
Gene segment
Researchers have successfully used the CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing tool to destroy Ewing's sarcoma and chronic myeloid leukemia tumor cells by targeting the fusion genes responsible for these tumors [1]. Fusion genes, a feature in many different types of cancer, arise when a mutation fuses two genes together, which typically happens when the DNA sequence between...
Spam
A group of scientists from Colorado State University has discovered that repetitive elements (REs) in our DNA increase with aging and react to known longevity-promoting interventions [1]. Are REs genomic parasites? At the dawn of genomic research scientists were stunned to learn that as much as 95% of our genome is non-coding: it does not...