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Tag: Cellular Senescence

Blood cancer
New research published in Cancer Discovery has outlined a potential new method of using senescent cells to encourage the immune system to attack cancer [1]. Senescent cancer cells and immune clearance Cellular senescence is a stress response [2], and cancer cells within tumors undergo significant stress: they lose access to oxygen and nutrients, they divide...
Good and bad
New research has scientists reconsidering the role of 'zombie' cells that drive some aspects of aging and whether they should be eliminated using senolytic drugs. It turns out that not all senescent cells are necessarily bad and that some may be helpful. Introducing zombie cells As we get older, more and more of our cells...
Mouse test
Researchers publishing in Nature Communications have detailed how the removal of p16-producing senescent cells leads to improvements in the brains of female mice [1]. Disease-associated microglia and senescence This paper begins with a discussion of disease-associated microglia (DAM) and white matter-associated microglia (WAM). In the aging brain, these exhausted microglia have downregulated genes relating to...
Duchenne
A study published in Aging has shown that the removal of senescent cells through senolytics alleviates muscle degeneration in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A genetic disease with hallmarks of aging Duchenne muscular dystrophy is caused by a mutation that gradually destroys the muscles, eventually becoming fatal as it destroys the diaphragm or...
Life Noggin Zombie Cells
Life Noggin, part of the Lifespan.io family of Youtube channels, regularly makes videos on a variety of interesting topics and has just published a new video about aging! This time, its mascot, Blocko, stars in a new video featuring a problem that's well known to regular Lifespan.io readers: senescent cells. The video was created by...
Skin fibroblast
Researchers publishing in Aging have identified an individual protein, secreted frizzled-related protein 4 (SFRP4), that is produced by senescent cells and contributes to skin aging in mice. The spread of the SASP Why we Age: Cellular SenescenceAs your body ages, more of your cells become senescent. Senescent cells do not divide or support the tissues...

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