Help us: Donate
Follow us on:
×

Menu

Back

Tag: Loss of Proteostasis

Links
Researchers publishing in Aging have discovered that an energy metabolism compound is associated with a protein that suppresses amyloid beta in a mouse model of Alzheimer's. The compounds involved The researchers describe nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 2 (Nmnat2) as a key co-factor for energy metabolism. This compound is involved in creating NAD+, which is essential in...
Balanced stones
Scientists have demonstrated that “the Alzheimer’s allele” APOE e4 helps cognition earlier in life prior to the onset of the disease [1]. This might point at a possible reason for some aspects of aging. What makes us stronger kills us later The risk of developing Alzheimer's, one of the deadliest age-related diseases, is considerably elevated...
Protein
Changing a single amino acid in a single protein boosts the fidelity of protein synthesis, and that is enough to increase lifespan in a variety of organisms, according to new research [1]. Proofreading proteins The loss of proteostasis is one of the hallmarks of aging. However, much of the research on the topic has focused...
Gut brain inflammation
A recent review published in Cureus shows why fecal microbial transplantation (FMT) might be able to help sufferers of Alzheimer's disease, showing how tightly the gut and brain are intertwined. Why would this ever work? The gut and brain are closely linked through biochemistry, and last month, we published an article about how the gut...
Saunas can activate heat shock proteins and may be a potential way to improve health and potentially, longevity.
There are a few reasons to consider including sauna use as part of your personal health and longevity strategy. What is a sauna? The word sauna comes from the Finnish language, and it means an earth or snow pit. While Finnish saunas today are typically log-walled, wooden paneled, or even tiled structures, these modern forms...
Solving brain puzzle
A recent study, led by the University of Cincinnati in collaboration with the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, challenges the popular amyloid hypothesis that has dominated Alzheimer’s research for decades. Amyloid accumulation may be the consequence, not the cause Over 100 years ago, Alois Alzheimer originally identified amyloid-beta plaques in the brains of people with the...