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Tag: Immunotherapy

April 25, 2019
Scientists from Johns Hopkins Medicine have reported the successful creation of a special type of gel that mimics the lymph nodes in our bodies. This gel recruits and multiplies T cells just like actual lymph nodes do, so it could help in the fight against cancer and immune system disorders. The lymph nodes are the...
April 03, 2019
At Undoing Aging 2019, we interviewed some of the best researchers who are involved in discovering therapies for the root causes of aging. Their research aims to ameliorate the damages of aging and may one day lead to a future without age-related diseases. Dr. Judith Campisi, one of the speakers at this conference, is a...
November 22, 2018
In a study published in the journal Immunology, Southampton University researchers have shown that a new antibody that they have engineered is able to combine two different anticancer approaches: depleting regulatory T cells and activating killer T cells [1]. Abstract The costimulatory receptor 4-1BB is expressed on activated immune cells, including activated T cells. Antibodies...
October 31, 2018
Researchers at the University of Notre Dame discovered that amino acid nitration can inhibit the activation of T cells employed in immunotherapy against cancer and that suppression of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) responsible for nitration can significantly boost the effectiveness of immunotherapy [1]. Abstract Potent immunosuppressive mechanisms within the tumor microenvironment contribute to the resistance...
October 10, 2018
Researchers at the Imperial College London have discovered that specifically employing invariant natural killer T cells, rather than generic T cells, in cancer immunotherapies based on chimeric antigen receptors might lead to significantly more effective, cheaper, and more easily mass-produced treatments [1]. Abstract Chimeric antigen receptor anti-CD19 (CAR19)-T cell immunotherapy-induced clinical remissions in CD19+ B...
October 03, 2018
Led by Dr. Alicja Copik, scientists at the University of Central Florida College of Medicine have discovered that it might be possible to make cancer immunotherapy work for a larger portion of patients by employing PM21-activated natural killer (PM21-NK) cells [1]. Study abstract Anti-PD-1/anti-PD-L1 therapies have shown success in cancer treatment but responses are limited...