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Tag: Gut Microbiome

Intestine
In Aging, a team of researchers has outlined a possible relationship between low grip strength and compounds in the gut microbiome. The gut-muscle axis As these researchers note, previous work has described many of the various ways in which metabolism is related to age-related muscle dysfunction, including inflammation, oxidative stress, accumulation of advanced glycation end-products...
Stressed intestines
A new study done in mice sheds light on how mental stress contributes to intestinal problems by altering microbiome composition [1]. Mind over matter Some experiences are not called “gut-wrenching” just metaphorically, as the brain can indeed influence gastrointestinal function in a myriad of ways. While most of them are adaptive, brain signals can also...
Lab rats
New research published in Brain investigated the influence of fecal microbiota transplants from Alzheimer’s patients on cognitive function and neurogenesis in rats and human cell cultures [1]. Microbiota-gut-brain axis There is a growing body of research reporting changes to the composition and metabolites in the microbiomes of Alzheimer’s patients [2]. Studies have also linked the...
Bacteriophages
Researchers publishing in Nature Microbiology have determined that the viruses populating the intestines of centenarians are slightly different from those of the merely old. Viruses for bacteria, not people We have written previously about a study showing that centenarians have youthful bacterial gut compositions (enterotypes) similar to those of younger people. This study looks more...
Elderly intestines
Research published today in Nature Aging has illustrated how the gut microbiomes of the longest-lived people are more likely to have bacterial populations associated with youth. A known difference This is far from the first study showing a connection between a healthy, youthful microbiome and enhanced longevity. In most people, the gut microbiome gradually transitions...
Rodent on exercise wheel
Scientists publishing in Nature have found that compounds produced by some types of gut bacteria can influence dopamine levels in the brain and, as a result, might influence motivation to go on a morning run [1]. We’ve got company We tend to think of ourselves as single organisms, but every human body serves as a...