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Oliver Medvedik, Ph.D.

About Oliver Medvedik, Ph.D.

Oliver Medvedik, Co-founder of Genspace citizen science laboratory in Brooklyn NY, earned his Ph.D. at Harvard Medical School in the Biomedical and Biological Sciences program. As part of his doctoral work he has used single-celled budding yeast as a model system to map the genetic pathways that underlie the processes of aging in more complex organisms, such as humans. Prior to arriving in Boston for his doctoral studies, he has lived most of his life in New York City. He obtained his bachelor’s degree in biology from Hunter College, City University of New York. Since graduating from Harvard, he has worked as a biotechnology consultant, taught molecular biology to numerous undergraduates at Harvard University and mentored two of Harvard’s teams for the international genetically engineered machines competition (IGEM) held annually at M.I.T. Oliver is also the Director of The Maurice Kanbar Center for Biomedical Engineering at the Cooper Union, New York City. The Maurice Kanbar Center for Biomedical Engineering is open to all Cooper Union faculty and students working on bioengineering projects requiring equipment and space for tissue culture, genetic engineering, biomechanics, and related research. Faculty that is currently using the facility are pursuing groundbreaking biomedical research in such fields as biomedical devices, tissue engineering, obstructive sleep apnea biomechanics also collaborating with several major New York City-based hospitals. The Kanbar Center continues to provide space for undergraduate teams participating in the international genetically engineered competition (iGEM) during the summer, as well as space for courses that offer a biological laboratory component.
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The next edition of Journal Club will be on 20th March at 13:00 EST/18:00 UK where we will be discussing a new discovery about telomerase, and a potential way we might use it to improve tissue regeneration in humans. We have talked about how the researchers found out how to supercharge stem cells in a...
In the February edition of Journal Club, we talked about the new publication by Dr. Maria Blasco which demonstrates the reversal of pulmonary fibrosis in a new mouse model. This is an important step forward for the potential treatment of fibrosis as currently there are no effective cures for this disease. We also wrote an...
We have been talking about a number of new studies in past Journal Clubs, so we thought it was time to get into some aging theory. We chose to cover one of the most cited and highly regarded damage theories of aging in this edition of the club. In this edition of Journal Club, we...
We are holding our second Journal Club live stream event on June 27th at 13:00 EST/18:00 UK. Oliver Medvedik, Ph.D., and the Ocean level Patrons will be discussing the research and the implications of epigenetic alterations on aging and as a primary aging process. The event will be streamed live to our Facebook page for viewers to...
The CRISPR system (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) has exploded onto the biotech sector as a relatively simple, highly efficient, and fast method for precisely introducing breaks into genomic loci [1-2]. The realization that it is a prokaryotic acquired immune system, although less often mentioned, has been equally paradigm changing [3]. Ironically, it's the...
The new research work on senolytic drugs by Baar et al. uses a rationally designed molecule that selectively targets senescent cells in vivo, both in an accelerated aging mouse model, and in normally aged mice as well, with few if any side effects[1]. Senolytics are a new class of potential anti-aging drugs that function by specifically...

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