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Tag: Animals

Naked mole-rat tunneling
The researchers of a previous controversial paper on the naked mole-rat's impressive longevity have returned, publishing data in GeroScience that bolsters their original findings. A darling of longevity The naked mole-rat, an unusually long-lived rodent species that lives in large colonies, has long been a mystery of gerontology, and investigations into its biology have yielded...
Jellyfish Age Backwards
The quest for eternal youth, encapsulated in Dr. Malcolm's fictional yet profound declaration that "Life finds a way," mirrors humanity's age-old fascination with longevity. This fascination isn't new; as Nicolas Brendborg's "Jellyfish Age Backwards – Nature's Secrets to Longevity" expounds; it's as ancient as the epic tales of Ponce de Leon's mythical fountain of life...
DNA
Researchers have analyzed the activity of genes in the livers, kidneys, and brains of over a hundred mammals and found genes that are consistently associated with longevity [1]. The search for longevity-associated genes Between the shortest-living and the longest-living mammal, there is a more than 100-fold difference in lifespan. This natural difference may be key...
Researchers publishing in npj regenerative medicine have found that destroying senescent cells through a well-known senolytic combination gives older killifish back some of their regenerative abilities. Regeneration, for a while Killifish, like starfish and salamanders, are some of the most well-known regenerators of the animal kingdom, able to even regenerate brain tissue [1]. However, these...
Cnidarian
Scientists have demonstrated that full-body regeneration in cnidarians, a group of animals that includes the jellyfish and hydra, can be driven by signals from senescent cells [1]. This might be the original purpose of cellular senescence. Why can’t we regrow our arms? There are many examples of amazing regenerative abilities in the animal kingdom, but...
Bowhead Whale
Scientists have found a possible explanation for bowhead whales’ exceptional lifespan, and it might be translatable to humans [1]. More cells, less cancer With some exceptions, body size is strongly correlated with longevity across species. While this can be explained evolutionarily (larger species have fewer extrinsic threats, which favors slow reproduction and longer lifespan), it...