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Category: Concerns

Death Clock
In this article, I’m not going to question the assumption about the inevitability of death; rather, I will take it for granted and try to explain why I think it has no relevance whatsoever to whether or not rejuvenation is worth pursuing. Getting to the heart of this particular argument against life extension I find...
What is it that really matters: preserving individual lives or preserving humanity? Is it more important to grant individuals the option to live as long as they'd like in good health, or is it more important to ensure the preservation of our species? This sort of question isn't unheard of in the context of discussions...
Sometimes advocates of developing technologies for healthy life extension are faced with the accusation that what they support is just a fear of death, like not being scared is somehow macho or brave. War used to be fashionable but now it isn't These days, war is not really portrayed in a very good light. When...
The discussion of increased lifespans through medical and technological methods of addressing the various processes of aging raises the concern that this could lead to a lack of resources and result in conflict and suffering. The argument suggests that we will run out of resources if we develop the technology to treat age-related diseases. Proponents of this line of...
A longer life does not have to me more time spent sick or frail if we develop the technology to address the causes of aging.
Whenever the topic of increasing human lifespan is discussed, the concern is sometimes raised that a longer life would mean a life spent frail and decrepit. This is sometimes known as the Tithonus error and shows a fundamental misunderstanding of the aims of rejuvenation biotechnology. The concern is based on the ancient Greek myth of...
When you discuss any major issue, sooner or later someone will say it: there are more urgent issues than whatever it is you’re advocating for. Sometimes it may be true; other times, and probably most of the time, it’s a logical fallacy known as appeal to worse problems (or “not as bad as”, or even...