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Chemotherapy Accelerates Age-Related Tauopathy and Cognitive Decline in Mice

Chemotherapy Accelerates Age-Related Tauopathy and Cognitive Decline in Mice
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It is fair to say that the extended chemotherapy treatment that is provided to cancer patients has the side-effect of accelerating aging. On the one hand, we can look at the epidemiological data to see the reduction in life expectancy and increased risk of age-related disease suffered by cancer survivors who underwent chemotherapy. It is also possible to look at various aging-associated biomarkers and see that they indicate an older biological age in these former patients. With the modern acceptance of senescent cell accumulation as an important cause of aging, it has become clear that the generation of excess senescent cells by chemotherapeutics is most likely the primary cause of accelerated aging in chemotherapy patients.

chemotherapy treatmentlife expectancylook at various aging-associated biomarkerssenescent cell accumulationgeneration of excess senescent cells by chemotherapeuticsthe primary cause of accelerated aging

Lingering senescent cells build up in tissues with age, and secrete a potent mix of inflammatory signals and other harmful molecules that rouse the immune system into chronic inflammation, disrupt tissue structure and function, and cause nearby cells to change their behavior for the worse as well. When treating cancer, forcing cancer cells into senescence is beneficial: they stop replicating, and most self-destruct. Chemotherapy is fairly indiscriminate,